The Slow Web

Things have been pretty… slow around here. Nice to spot this bit about that thing. (Thanks to Buzz.)

jackcheng:

One of the better spots to enjoy a bowl of ramen noodles here in New York is Minca, in the East Village. Minca is the kind of place just out of the way enough that as you’re about to get there, you start wondering if you’ve already passed it. A bowl of noodles at Minca isn’t quite as neatly put together as those of other ramen establishments in the city, but it is without a doubt among the tastiest. There’s a home-cooked quality to a bowl of noodles at Minca. And there’s a homey vibe to the restaurant. Minca is a good place to meet a friend and sit and talk and eat and drink, and eat and talk and sit and drink some more.

The last time I was at Minca, I had an especially enjoyable conversation with Walter Chen. Walter is the CEO of a company called iDoneThis, a quiet little service that helps you catalog the things you’ve accomplished each day. iDoneThis sends you a daily email at your specified time, and you simply reply with a list of things you did that day. It’s useful for teams who want to keep track of what everyone is working on, and for individuals who just want to keep track.

I first reached out to Walter because I was mesmerized by this koan at the bottom of the daily emails:

iDoneThis is a part of the slow web movement. After you email us, your calendar is not updated instantaneously. But rest up, and you’ll find an updated calendar when you wake.

iDoneThis is a part of the slow web movement. The Slow Web Movement. I’d never heard that phrase before. I immediately started digging around—and by that I mean I googled “Slow Web Movement”—and the lone relevant search result was a blog post from two years ago. If you run the search again today, you’ll find Walter’s writeup on his company blog, which reflects a lot of what he told me over dinner.

As we talked further, I said to Walter that as soon as I saw “the slow web movement,” I assigned my own meaning to it. Because it’s a great name, and great names are like knots—they’re woven from the same stringy material as other words, but in their particular arrangement, they catch, become junctions to which new threads arrive, from which other threads depart. For me, “The Slow Web” neatly tied together a slew of dangling thoughts.

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Cite Arrow reblogged from jackcheng
Did you know the average person pauses less than 8 seconds to take in a work of art? Break the cycle of speeding through museums by participating in a Slow Art event at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. 
Slow Art at the Smithsonian

Did you know the average person pauses less than 8 seconds to take in a work of art? Break the cycle of speeding through museums by participating in a Slow Art event at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Slow Art at the Smithsonian

Things Magazine has been slow web since before things started moving so damn fast — they’ve been bringing the awesome to the interwebs since 1994.
Each infrequent post provides a week’s worth of reading material, and there’s nary a weak link in the batch.
things magazine: an online journal about objects and meanings

Things Magazine has been slow web since before things started moving so damn fast — they’ve been bringing the awesome to the interwebs since 1994.

Each infrequent post provides a week’s worth of reading material, and there’s nary a weak link in the batch.

things magazine: an online journal about objects and meanings

Raul was slow web long before 20x200 slowed him down even more. Sometimes I wish we didn’t keep him so damn busy with all this crazy art stuff; when he writes posts like this one it makes me wish I could read what he was thinking much more often.
The beach was empty save for a solitary figure in the far distance. I wasn’t until I got close that I realized it was Kennedy. He was wearing a windbreaker and staring out to sea, hands in his pockets. He was a big hippopotamus of a man, wind whipping his hair around, but he was calm. He stood there for a very long time. What does a guy with that much incident in his life think about in those moments?
(via Heading East: Kennedy & the Ocean)

Raul was slow web long before 20x200 slowed him down even more. Sometimes I wish we didn’t keep him so damn busy with all this crazy art stuff; when he writes posts like this one it makes me wish I could read what he was thinking much more often.

The beach was empty save for a solitary figure in the far distance. I wasn’t until I got close that I realized it was Kennedy. He was wearing a windbreaker and staring out to sea, hands in his pockets. He was a big hippopotamus of a man, wind whipping his hair around, but he was calm. He stood there for a very long time. What does a guy with that much incident in his life think about in those moments?

(via Heading East: Kennedy & the Ocean)

"What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients," he wrote. The more information, the less attention, and "the need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it."
(via A Short Manifesto on the Future of Attention: Observatory: Design Observer)

"What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients," he wrote. The more information, the less attention, and "the need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it."

(via A Short Manifesto on the Future of Attention: Observatory: Design Observer)

BibliOdyssey’s well-curated sets of images speak volumes with few, if any, words.
PK, the site’s author, has patience, vision and impeccable taste.
Real-world related:BibliOdyssey: Amazing Archival Images from the Internet
Hat tip to Texturism for the image here, which is from The Embryology of Turtles (posted 2006)

BibliOdyssey’s well-curated sets of images speak volumes with few, if any, words.

PK, the site’s author, has patience, vision and impeccable taste.

Real-world related:BibliOdyssey: Amazing Archival Images from the Internet

Hat tip to Texturism for the image here, which is from The Embryology of Turtles (posted 2006)

Slow can be bright; Joanne McNeil’s Tomorrow Museum shines thusly.
A small bit from her most recent post, The Daily Death: When A Celebrity Dies Every 15 Minutes:
In the future, a famous person will die every fifteen minutes. Already it’s happening. The ascent of the microcelebrities, the 24 hour news cycle, citizen journalism, and our darkest fantasies all collide on Twitter now. The website’s rhetorical question “What are you doing?” sometimes feels more like “Who died today?”

Slow can be bright; Joanne McNeil’s Tomorrow Museum shines thusly.

A small bit from her most recent post, The Daily Death: When A Celebrity Dies Every 15 Minutes:

In the future, a famous person will die every fifteen minutes. Already it’s happening. The ascent of the microcelebrities, the 24 hour news cycle, citizen journalism, and our darkest fantasies all collide on Twitter now. The website’s rhetorical question “What are you doing?” sometimes feels more like “Who died today?”

I only started documenting instances of “a web that’s well-considered and worth savoring” this past weekend, but they’ve (ironically?) accumulated quickly. Taking a cue from the Slow Food movement, I’m trying to draw more attention to the sites that pay attention to you. And by you, I mean me, and by us, I mean the universal consumer. And by pay attention, I mean show respect for the fact that we’re giving them our time and attention. This is something well-applied to almost any experience, whether it’s food or web or, in the case of our KBB, shopping.
If we really take the time to savor what we consume, we’re more inclined to be discerning about what exactly the input is. Conversely, if the makers of what we consume know that we’re paying attention, they’re more likely to give us the good stuff. Oh yes, my theory is riddled with flaws, I realize as I type this, but allow me some idealism, won’t you please? Work with me people!
It’s kind of how I see this here newsletter too. I take a lot of time to make them, and I certainly don’t make them alone. A lot goes into forming my ramblings into something fit for your consumption. We go through several phases of editing, and that’s just for the words. We’re not perfect, but we sure do try hard — we figure that if you’re going to take the time to read, we should take the time to put something together that’s worth your while. Conversely, I’ve gotten a lot of wonderful feedback (constructive criticism included!) from people who look forward to what I have to say because they know how much work I put into it. What a virtuous cycle no?
—From today’s The 20x200 Newsletter

I only started documenting instances of “a web that’s well-considered and worth savoring” this past weekend, but they’ve (ironically?) accumulated quickly. Taking a cue from the Slow Food movement, I’m trying to draw more attention to the sites that pay attention to you. And by you, I mean me, and by us, I mean the universal consumer. And by pay attention, I mean show respect for the fact that we’re giving them our time and attention. This is something well-applied to almost any experience, whether it’s food or web or, in the case of our KBB, shopping.

If we really take the time to savor what we consume, we’re more inclined to be discerning about what exactly the input is. Conversely, if the makers of what we consume know that we’re paying attention, they’re more likely to give us the good stuff. Oh yes, my theory is riddled with flaws, I realize as I type this, but allow me some idealism, won’t you please? Work with me people!

It’s kind of how I see this here newsletter too. I take a lot of time to make them, and I certainly don’t make them alone. A lot goes into forming my ramblings into something fit for your consumption. We go through several phases of editing, and that’s just for the words. We’re not perfect, but we sure do try hard — we figure that if you’re going to take the time to read, we should take the time to put something together that’s worth your while. Conversely, I’ve gotten a lot of wonderful feedback (constructive criticism included!) from people who look forward to what I have to say because they know how much work I put into it. What a virtuous cycle no?

—From today’s The 20x200 Newsletter

Every Friday, rain or shine! (Scripting News)
Dave Winer wants to share a Coke with you on the Slow Web.
(via Anil)

Every Friday, rain or shine! (Scripting News)

Dave Winer wants to share a Coke with you on the Slow Web.

(via Anil)